LePage, Poliquin pack groceries to highlight inflation as Democrats hit back at taxes

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Former Governor Paul LePage and former 2nd District Rep. Bruce Poliquin shopped at Gowell’s Shop and Save in Greene on Saturday to highlight inflation and rising costs in Maine. Both LePage and Poliquin are seeking to return to their seats in 2022. LePage is running unopposed in Tuesday’s GOP gubernatorial primary and is expected to face Gov. Janet Mills in the November general election. Poliquin takes on Liz Caruso in a GOP primary on Tuesday, where the winner will face 2nd District Rep. Jared Golden in November. the third highest in the nation, and nothing has been done in Augusta,” LePage said, citing data from the Economic Policy InstituteAccording to data from the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, Maine’s inflation rate since the start of 2021 is currently tied for the fourth lowest in the country. LePage says he would help cut costs by eliminating taxes on trucks delivering goods to Maine as well as state income tax, a position he has long championed. He says he would make up for lost revenue through creative measures. “There are other forms of income you can generate,” LePage said. “You can make $100 million in sports betting if you do it right. When I became governor in 2011 we were making $10 million a year from liquor sales and when I left we were making $57 million a year. dollars on liquor sales. So there are other ways to do it.” Mills signed into law the sports betting legislation last month. She and Maine Democrats criticized LePage for raising the sales tax of the state during his tenure and for opposing policies they believe would have helped reduce costs for Maine residents.” If Paul LePage really cared about costs for Maine families, he wouldn’t would not have increased sales. taxes or helped raise property taxes while in office,” the Maine Democratic Party said in a statement. “Nor would he have blocked access to affordable health care, impeded affordable housing for seniors, or cut funding for child care – all moves that have increased costs for the people of Maine again and again.” LePage did not rule out increasing the sales tax or raising taxes on seasonal residents to help find additional revenue. “Everything would be on the table,” LePage said. “I don’t think you necessarily need to raise a tax, we should look at it. But in 2011, we lowered income tax from 8.5% to 7.15%. In 2012, we had the best revenue year in the state of Maine. “Numbers refer to the top rate in Maine’s tax bracket, which was lowered in 2015. LePage also criticized Mills for not doing enough to deal with rising fuel prices in Maine. costs, which hit a state average of $5.07 a gallon on Saturday.”The governor can do little things to reduce the fuel tax,” LePage said. “Like, for example, you could get 31 cents off gasoline right now.” The 31 cents refers to the state’s current gasoline tax, which is 30 cents for regular fuel and 31 for diesel. LePage referred to Mills’ divestment of public funds from fossil fuels as another example of a way to lower gasoline prices, a process that began this week.” While Governor Mills can’t control the global trend of pandemic-induced inflation, she worked with Democrats, R Republicans and Independents in the Legislature to send $850 relief checks to the Mainers — a plan LePage went against his own party to oppose,” the party statement read. “It’s the strong, stable leadership the Mainers want in their governor.” While checks were originally a Republican idea, LePage says the money should have been used to subsidize fuel oil instead of going directly to people. heat their homes this winter,” LePage said. “I’m telling you, this winter Maine is going to have a crisis.” Former U.S. Representative Bruce Poliquin says he believes Mainers are tired of high costs and have “I’m really worried about our seniors on fixed incomes and our young families with a bunch of kids, how are they going to pay for all of this,” Poliquin said. “It’s not necessary.” Poliquin faces to Liz Caruso in Tuesday’s GOP primary for the 2nd congressional district. Caruso attacked Poliquin for being out of touch with Maine voters, but Poliquin says Caruso isn’t used to delivering for people in the district.” I have a record,” Poliquin said. “My record is a real record of securing the border. I also have a real track record to make sure we were energy independent. I was approved by the NRA. I am used to defending life and religious freedoms. My opponent has no case.

Former Governor Paul LePage and former 2nd District Rep. Bruce Poliquin shopped at Gowell’s Shop and Save in Greene on Saturday to highlight inflation and rising costs in Maine.

LePage and Poliquin are both seeking to regain their seats in 2022. LePage is running unopposed in Tuesday’s GOP gubernatorial primary and is expected to face Gov. Janet Mills in the November general election. Poliquin takes on Liz Caruso in a GOP primary on Tuesday, where the winner will face 2nd District Rep. Jared Golden in November.

LePage has attempted to highlight the rising cost of food which he claims is the result of the policies of the Mills administration.

“The cost of food in Maine is the third highest in the country, and nothing has been done in Augusta,” LePage said, citing data from the Economic Policy Institute

According to data from the Congressional Joint Economic CommitteeMaine’s inflation rate since the start of 2021 is currently tied for the fourth-lowest in the nation.

LePage says he would help cut costs by eliminating taxes on trucks delivering goods to Maine as well as state income tax, a position he has long championed. He says he would make up for lost revenue with creative measures.

“There are other forms of income you can bring in,” LePage said. “You can make $100 million in sports betting if you do it right. When I became governor in 2011 we were making $10 million a year from liquor sales and when I left we were making $57 million a year. dollars on alcohol sales, so there are other ways to do it.

Mills signed into law the sports betting legislation last month. She and Maine Democrats have criticized LePage for raising the state sales tax during his tenure and for opposing policies they say would have helped lower costs for Mainers.

“If Paul LePage really cared about the costs to Maine families, he wouldn’t have raised sales taxes or helped raise property taxes when he was in office,” the Maine Democratic Party said in a statement. . “Nor would he have blocked access to affordable health care, impeded affordable housing for seniors, or cut funding for child care – all moves that have increased costs for the people of Maine again and again.”

LePage hasn’t ruled out raising sales tax or raising taxes on seasonal residents to help find additional revenue.

“Everything would be on the table,” LePage said. “I don’t think you necessarily need to raise a tax, we should look at it. But in 2011, we lowered income tax from 8.5% to 7.15%. 2012 was the best revenue year in the state of Maine. »

Numbers refer to the top rate of Maine’s tax bracket, which was lowered in 2015.

LePage also criticized Mills for not doing enough to deal with rising fuel costs in Maine, which averaged $5.07 a gallon on Saturday.

“The governor can do little things to lower the fuel tax,” LePage said. “Like for example, you could get 31 cents worth of gas right now.”

The 31 cents refers to the current state gasoline tax, which is 30 cents for regular fuel and 31 for diesel. LePage cited Mills’ divestment of public funds from fossil fuels as another example of how to lower gasoline prices.

The Maine Democratic Party responded by touting Mills’ efforts to relieve Mainers by using half of the state’s budget surplus to send $850 checks to Maine taxpayers, a process that began this week.

“While Governor Mills cannot control the global trend of pandemic-induced inflation, she has worked with Democrats, Republicans and Independents in the Legislature to send $850 relief checks to Mainers – a plan that LePage opposed against his own party,” the party said. “It’s the strong, stable leadership the Mainers want in their governor.”

While checks were originally a Republican idea, LePage says the money should have been used to subsidize fuel oil instead of going directly to people.

“I would have taken a really big chunk of that money and put it in an account to help homeowners heat their homes this winter,” LePage said. “I’m telling you, this winter Maine is going to have a crisis.”

Former U.S. Representative Bruce Poliquin says he believes the Mainers are tired of high costs and eager for change.

“I’m really worried for our seniors on fixed incomes and our young families with a bunch of kids, how are they going to pay for all of this,” Poliquin said. “It’s not necessary.”

Poliquin faces Liz Caruso in Tuesday’s GOP primary for the 2nd congressional district. Caruso attacked Poliquin for being out of touch with Maine voters, but Poliquin says Caruso isn’t used to delivering for district residents.

“I have a record,” Poliquin said. “My assessment is a real assessment of border security. I also have a real track record to make sure we were energy independent. I was approved by the NRA. I am used to defending life and religious freedoms. My opponent has no case.

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